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Showing posts from April, 2018

EdCamp Elmbrook 21

  We had out 5th annual EdCamp this past Saturday and it was a very different PD experience. Due to the pandemic, we help the EdCamp virtually. That meant that anyone across the globe could attend. While we usually only have educators from out region attend, we had educators across the nation and in some in Canada attend. In addition, we had an attendee from Turkey! The conference was conducted using Zoom and Zoom breakout rooms for the sessions. The team did a great job of organization and management. I could go on, but this is my first blog post in a while and I'd like to keep it brief. Below you'll find the session board for the day with notes docs linked. We had some wonderful sessions and the notes documents house some wonderful thoughts and resources. So, I recommend checking them out. Although this EdCamp was only for the morning, there was a lot of learning to be had. We had no technology issues from our end as organizers but I can imagine participants may have had iss

When the Lecture's Over, the Learning Begins

“How do you react when your students don’t grasp a concept or skill the first time you teach it?” Bell, Kasey. Shake Up Learning: Practical Ideas to Move Learning from Static to Dynamic (Kindle Location 780). Dave Burgess Consulting, Inc.. Kindle Edition. If you listen to the talk in educational chats today, you will hear phrases like “fail forward” and “FAIL = First Attempt In Learning”. The general idea is that we don’t expect success the first time we try something. So, we shouldn’t expect students to master a concept or skill the first time they try it. Teachers and students need to be ok with this fact. There is a lot of debate in my school around applying this idea to summative assessments, not just formative. I have a very strong opinion on this topic, but this is not the post for that. (But, I imagine you may already know where I stand on telling a student it’s time to stop learning.)   For the sake of this post, let’s look at pre-summative assessment learning. If

Student Voice on Technology

As I looked at the reflection questions in Kasey Bell’s new book Shake Up Learning , I began thinking wouldn’t it be interesting to see what my students have to say about some of them.  The specific questions that led to this thought were the following: What opportunities has technology brought to your classroom? What problems or barriers keep you from using technology effectively? Bell, Kasey. Shake Up Learning: Practical Ideas to Move Learning from Static to Dynamic (Kindle Locations 653-654). Dave Burgess Consulting, Inc.. Kindle Edition. I was really curious what my students thoughts were.  So, I put them in a end of unit feedback survey. I slightly rephrased them to be a bit more specific to our classroom, but they were essentially the same question. For a little background on the state of technology in our school. Our students are 1:1 with Chromebooks and we have public wifi network, private wifi network, and a specific chromebook network. Before the Chromebooks

I YouTube too

A reflection question in Kasey Bell’s new book Shake Up Learning asks, How has technology changed your personal life? Professional life? Bell, Kasey. Shake Up Learning: Practical Ideas to Move Learning from Static to Dynamic (Kindle Locations 462-463). Dave Burgess Consulting, Inc.. Kindle Edition. When I think about all of the different tech tools I have used in the classroom, there are quite a few. I would say that the greatest tools for students to wield are tools for creations. From my perspective, though, my greatest technology tools to help students learn are ones that allow them to experience phenomena. This could be through videos or simulations. They have revolutionized the ability to explore by seeing and doing. The one tool that has found a place in both my classroom and my home lives is YouTube. I know it may be super obvious, but the more I think about it, the more amazing YouTube is. I have lived through the age of films, filmstrips, video tapes, a

The Pedagogy & the Pendulum

"We all watch the pendulum swing back and forth when it comes to pedagogy and best practices in instruction and assessment." Bell, Kasey. Shake Up Learning: Practical Ideas to Move Learning from Static to Dynamic (Kindle Locations 366-368). Dave Burgess Consulting, Inc.. Kindle Edition. In her new book Shake Up Learning , Kasey Bell asks readers to reflect on their career and react to the pendulum of pedagogy. Specifically, she asks how we have reacted to these changes. I’d like to look specifically at how technology has changed my what I do in the classroom. There are some basic science skills that we expect students to become proficient at.  These have recently been formalized as a part of the Next Generation Science Standards . These practices include ones that are highly related to technology in the classroom such as Developing and Using Models Planning and Carrying Out Investigations Using Mathematical and Computational Thinking Constructing E